20 Things to do after installing Fedora 15

Here are few things you can do after installing Fedora 15 to make the experience better. You may have to enable sudo to follow some of the tips or you can run the commands in terminal by logging in as root (su). The following are in no particular order. Feel free to skip the ones you do not need.

1. Enable sudo

2. Install yum-fastestmirror plugin
yum-fastestmirror selects the fastest mirror for updating and installing packages. It can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install yum-fastestmirror

3. Add shutdown menu item permanently

4. Install flash player

5. Add minimize, maximize title bar buttons

6. Enable delete key in Nautilus

7. Enable right click on desktop and add Desktop folder on the Desktop

8. Show date on top panel

9. Install nautilus open terminal
If you use terminal a lot, you may want to have “Open in terminal” in folders in Nautilus file manager. To do so, install the package nautilus-open-terminal

sudo yum install nautilus-open-terminal

10. Install a torrent client
If you download via torrents, you will need a torrent client. While Fedora ships with Transmission Torrent Cliene, I prefer Vuze (Azureus) (written in Java). It can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install azureus

You may also like deluge (written in Python, Gtk) which is also an excellent alternative. It can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install deluge

11. Install Google Chrome
Although Firefox 4 is shipped by default, you may want to have a secondary browser or may prefer Google Chrome. You can simply download rpm from Google Chrome download page and install it. The package will automatically insert repository information so that you get updates from update manager.

12. Install Libreoffice
Libreoffice is available in the repository. I recommend “Add/Remove Software” to select and install office tools you need. libreoffice-writer (Word processor) and libreoffice-calc (Spreadsheet) is all I need. You may also want libreoffice-impress (Presentation) and libreoffice-draw (Drawing).

13. Install Thunderbird
I prefer Thunderbird to Evolution. You can install it from repository by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install thunderbird

14. Install a clipboard manager
If you do a lot of writing or programming, you will love a clipboard manager. I like parcellite and it is available in the repos as well. It can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install parcellite

UPDATE: You may also like another clipboard manager called GPaste which integrates well with Gnome Shell.

15. Install Google Voice and Video chat
If you use Google Voice, you can download and install rpm package from Google Voice and Video Download page.

16. Add support for media formats

17. Install support for rar and 7z archive formats
Rar is a proprietary format but it is used widely and you may encounter rar files so it is handy to have it installed.

sudo yum localinstall --nogpgcheck http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm
sudo yum install unrar

7z is also a popular format and it is also available in the repository.

sudo yum install p7zip p7zip-plugins

18. Install Gimp
Fedora does not ship with an image editor. I prefer Gimp and it can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install gimp

19. Install gnome-tweak-tool to customize fonts, themes etc
gnome-tweak-tool can be installed by running the following in the terminal:

sudo yum install gnome-tweak-tool

Run it (press Alt+F2 and type in gnome-tweak-tool) and change the settings. It does not have OK or Apply and simply selecting the options performs the changes. Some changes may require logging out and logging back in.

20. Install skype
Skype is a popular text, voice and video chat tool. You can download and install rpm from this link. If you have 32-bit, installation will be straightforward. However, if you have 64-bit, please read this post.

Please share what you did after installing Fedora 15 in the comments.

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  • Expressions

    Cant tell how much i loved this

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  • jayanth

    Useful…very useful..Thanks for the help…

  • Parivesh

    why it is necessary to do SUDO?

    • http://www.khattam.info _khAttAm_

      Quick and easy way of getting root access and securer than actual root login.

  • Parivesh

    why it is necessary to do SUDO?

  • Don

    how to hide the content of folder in fedora 15? i used to do some setting in permission option of folder in ubuntu, but i dont know how now, suggest me the better option….

    • http://www.khattam.info _khAttAm_

      You have similar permission options in Fedora 15 / Gnome 3 too, but I’m not sure if listing file can be disabled via permissions (unless you use another account to disable listing)… Adding a dot (.) at the beginning of a file/directory name hides it from the file manager (unless you have Show Hidden Files option enabled).

  • kurtdriver

    I don’t know that sudo is more secure than a root login, at least that requires that you have the rot password. Using sudo the way that you suggest means that anyone who gets your password is root.
    Sudo can be set up to be secure, but not will ALL, only allowing specific non-privileged to access commands that are listed in the file. For instance, allowing the user john access to nmap will allow him to run that program, but not delete root level files or install software. Many Fedora users are the only authorized users of their machines, for them the best way is to run su -c “command and parameters”

    • Anonymous

      the assumption is that you’re setting this up as an “admin” for yourself. If you have anyone else who connects with their own accounts, you obviously don’t set them up with in sudoers. I thought that was implied. Also, if you check administrator last during your initial account creation during install then log in and type sudo whoami, you should find that you are already properly set up for sudo. I personally think having a true root account is quite insecure.

  • menotu3169

    #5. Add minimize, maximize title bar buttons

    #7. Enable right click on desktop and add Desktop folder on the Desktop
    #19 Install gnome-tweak-tool to customize fonts, themes etc

    Those 3 are all basically the same.

    #19 says Install gnome-tweak-tool, #7 is accomplished by using gnome-tweak-tool and #5 CAN be accomplished using gnome-tweak-tool, even though you go about it another way.

    I like your list, but I think those three should be combined into one.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000726145853 Gilli Pong

    Fantastic! Short and simple! Loved every word and incredibly useful!

  • anon

    thanks loads was a great help.

  • nate

    Thanks this saved me much frustration!

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  • nadim

    In short, install easyLife (www.easylifeproject.org) !

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  • chessmaster

    hey thanks your guide is a noob ‘lifesaver’ :)

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for the great post! Linux noob thanks you.

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  • http://twitter.com/fuddstar Fahad Talib

    installed “bash-completion” to enable tab completion in terminal. 
    sudo yum install bash-completion

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TPKKDJDVHVXWFNR6XZKLKUMJOQ JeevaniW

    One thing you cannot do without: A Taskbar
    Install and run:   “gnome-panel –replace”.
    This will give you a top and a bottom panel; the top one covered over by the default panel.
    Install and run: “dconf-editor”
    Edit: org -> gnome -> gnome-panel -> layout -> toplevels -> top-panel
        Set option to auto-hide the top panel, and that gets it out of the way at the top.
    Alt/right-click on the bottom panel and choose the Options;
        set Background to “Solid Color”; choose black (rgb:000); set Style to 60% transparant.
    Alt/right-click and choose ‘Add to panel'; search for ‘Main Menu’ and ‘Add';
        Alt/right-clock on the new ‘Main Menu’ icon, and select ‘Move’, than drag the icon to the leftmost corner on the taskbar.
    Add other items as needed.
    To startup the newly configured taskbar upon login:
        run ‘gnome-session-properties’ and Add ‘gnome-panel –replace’

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TPKKDJDVHVXWFNR6XZKLKUMJOQ JeevaniW

    One thing you cannot do without: A Taskbar
    Install and run:   “gnome-panel –replace”.
    This will give you a top and a bottom panel; the top one covered over by the default panel.
    Install and run: “dconf-editor”
    Edit: org -> gnome -> gnome-panel -> layout -> toplevels -> top-panel
        Set option to auto-hide the top panel, and that gets it out of the way at the top.
    Alt/right-click on the bottom panel and choose the Options;
        set Background to “Solid Color”; choose black (rgb:000); set Style to 60% transparant.
    Alt/right-click and choose ‘Add to panel'; search for ‘Main Menu’ and ‘Add';
        Alt/right-clock on the new ‘Main Menu’ icon, and select ‘Move’, than drag the icon to the leftmost corner on the taskbar.
    Add other items as needed.
    To startup the newly configured taskbar upon login:
        run ‘gnome-session-properties’ and Add ‘gnome-panel –replace’

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TPKKDJDVHVXWFNR6XZKLKUMJOQ JeevaniW

    One thing you cannot do without: A Taskbar
    Install and run:   “gnome-panel –replace”.
    This will give you a top and a bottom panel; the top one covered over by the default panel.
    Install and run: “dconf-editor”
    Edit: org -> gnome -> gnome-panel -> layout -> toplevels -> top-panel
        Set option to auto-hide the top panel, and that gets it out of the way at the top.
    Alt/right-click on the bottom panel and choose the Options;
        set Background to “Solid Color”; choose black (rgb:000); set Style to 60% transparant.
    Alt/right-click and choose ‘Add to panel'; search for ‘Main Menu’ and ‘Add';
        Alt/right-clock on the new ‘Main Menu’ icon, and select ‘Move’, than drag the icon to the leftmost corner on the taskbar.
    Add other items as needed.
    To startup the newly configured taskbar upon login:
        run ‘gnome-session-properties’ and Add ‘gnome-panel –replace’

    • http://www.khattam.info _khAttAm_

      Thanks

  • http://twitter.com/UgglyBabee blackbelt_jones

    The first thing I did after seeing Fedora 15 with Gnome 3 was reformat my hard drive and install Debian. And then I went out for Chinese food.

  • Anonymous

    Nice collection, thank you..

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  • Eduard

    Thanks for sharing…
    Begginer on linux systems

  • sangeeta m

    thanks liked it a lot :)