Tag Archives: Kernel

[HOWTO] Install Linux Kernel 3.0 in Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

Linux Kernel 3.0 RC 1 was recently released. Although it does not have real changes to anything, but is just a renaming of 2.6.40, however, you may want to install it for testing and using it if it works good for you in your Ubuntu Natty installation. It has bug fixes and additional drivers so it may solve problems. However, it may also introduce new problems, so be careful not to remove the other kernel (2.6.38) after installing it. This tutorial also contains instructions to remove it safely, so read along. Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot will be released with kernel 3.0.

As of writing this, only amd64 (64 bit version) of the kernel is available in Kernel PPA, so if you are using 32-bit, it will not work for you. However, if you find i386 builds in the kernel ppa, you can install it. (UPDATE: Now both 32-bit and 64-bit versions are available)

First of all, download the debs from Kernel PPA. Then install in this order:
linux-headers
linux-headers-generic
linux-image

Once installation is done, reboot and Ubuntu should boot into 3.0 by default. If everything works right, you may want to keep it, however, if it does not, don’t worry, just reboot and select one of the previous versions and boot into it. Then open up synaptic, search for linux-headers-3 and linux-image-3 and remove the 3.0 versions.

If you are reading this after other versions are released, you may want to check out kernel ppa.

[SOLVED] Error: unable to find the sources of your current Linux kernel. Specify KERN_DIR= and run Make again. Stop.

I was trying to run Oracle Virtualbox in my Debian testing installation in which I have just installed Ubuntu Natty Kernel from Ubuntu repositories. I got an error followed by a dialog prompting me to run:
/etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup
as root.

However, it could not compile the kernel modules and I got the following error:

Uninstalling modules from DKMS
removing old DKMS module vboxhost version 3.2.10

——– Uninstall Beginning ——–
Module: vboxhost
Version: 3.2.10
Kernel: 2.6.32-5-686-bigmem (i686)
————————————-

Status: Before uninstall, this module version was ACTIVE on this kernel.

vboxdrv.ko:
– Uninstallation
– Deleting from: /lib/modules/2.6.32-5-686-bigmem/updates/dkms/
– Original module
– No original module was found for this module on this kernel.
– Use the dkms install command to reinstall any previous module version.

vboxnetflt.ko:
– Uninstallation
– Deleting from: /lib/modules/2.6.32-5-686-bigmem/updates/dkms/
– Original module
– No original module was found for this module on this kernel.
– Use the dkms install command to reinstall any previous module version.

vboxnetadp.ko:
– Uninstallation
– Deleting from: /lib/modules/2.6.32-5-686-bigmem/updates/dkms/
– Original module
– No original module was found for this module on this kernel.
– Use the dkms install command to reinstall any previous module version.

depmod……

DKMS: uninstall Completed.

——————————
Deleting module version: 3.2.10
completely from the DKMS tree.
——————————
Done.
Attempting to install using DKMS

Creating symlink /var/lib/dkms/vboxhost/3.2.10/source ->
/usr/src/vboxhost-3.2.10

DKMS: add Completed.
You can use the –kernelsourcedir option to tell DKMS where it’s located, or you could install the linux-headers-2.6.37-6-generic-pae package.
Failed to install using DKMS, attempting to install without
Makefile:159: *** Error: unable to find the sources of your current Linux kernel. Specify KERN_DIR= and run Make again. Stop.

I realized that I had just installed linux-image package only and not installed linux-headers while manually installing packages. This can be avoided by installing the corresponding headers. An easy way to do so is to run the following command:

sudo apt-get install dkms
sudo apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r|cut -d'-' -f3`-`uname -r|cut -d'-' -f4`

If you are using the older kernel and not the latest version available in the repost\itory, run the following:

sudo apt-get install dkms
sudo apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r`

If you are on Debian, sudo may or may not be installed and it may or may not be configured for your user. Just use su to login as root and run the commands without sudo.

Hope this helps.

Fixing Slow, Choppy and Laggy Maverick Meerkat (Ubuntu 10.10)

A lot of Ubuntu 10.10 users have been complaining about Maverick being too slow, typing becoming laggy and video performance being choppy.   Here are few things you can try to make it fast again. These have been collected from the user experience discussed in this post in Ubuntu forums.

Update your kernel to latest Mainline kernel

Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat uses version 2.6.35 of Linux Kernel. A lot of users have solved their problems by upgrading to version 2.6.36. You can do so by downloading the deb files and installing them from the Ubuntu Kernel Mainline PPA: http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/ Open the latest version that is available (rc8 is the latest in the time of writing this, however only 64bit is available, if you have 32-bit, use rc7) and download the following files:
linux-headers-VERSION_all.deb
linux-headers-VERSION-generic_VERSION_amd64.deb
linux-image-VERSION-generic_VERSION_amd64.deb

If you have 32bit, choose the ones that contain i386 instead of amd64 in the name.
Install them one by one in the same order as listed above and reboot.

Note that if that does not help and if you want to switch back to 2.6.35 kernel again, you can always remove 2.6.36 kernel from Synaptic Package Manager (Alt+F2>gksu synaptic). Also note that you will not get updates to 2.6.36 even if newer versions are out, so you should update manually later if you find newer versions of 2.6.36 kernels.

Clean install

If upgrading the kernel doesn’t help you, you may want to clean install in case you have upgraded from previous versions. That may not help most of you, but still might. If you have installed 64-bit version, you may even want to switch to 32bit version as many users have reported to have no problems with 32bit version. If you install 32-bit version and have 4GB or more RAM, you should install linux-generic-pae kernel from Synaptic Package Manager so that your system can make use of all of your RAM. Some users have also mentioned going to LinuxMint has solved their problems. Or if all elese fails, go back to Lucid (10.04) and wait for Natty Narwhal (11.04) to be released.

Hope this helps.

[HOWTO] Install latest Intel DRM Kernel to avoid crashes on boards with Intel HD Graphics

My friend has a laptop with Intel Core i3 and onboard Intel HD graphics. His Ubuntu used to crash very often. He is using latest Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx. He then upgraded to latest kernel 2.6.35-997 from drm-intel-next from drm-intel-next PPA which has stopped the crashing. However, the kernel is development kernel and you should use it with caution. If it fails to boot or causes problems, you can always hold on shift key during boot and then boot into the older kernel and remove it from the package manager. Having said that, here is how to install the latest kernel in Ubuntu from the drm-intel-next PPA.
Goto drm-intel-next PPA and then download the following files:
linux-headers-X-all.deb
linux-headers-X.deb
linux-image-X.deb
Here, X is the version which you can use whatever is available and refers to your Ubuntu architecture. In the PPA, 32-bit (i386) and 64-bit (amd64) are available. If you don’t know the architecture of your installation, you can easily check by typing the command

uname -m

in the terminal. If it says x86_64, you should go for amd64 and if it says iX86 (i686 for example), go for i386.
After the download, install in the above order and reboot and it should boot into your newly installed kernel.

Hope this helps.

[HOWTO] Installing Kernel 2.6.33 on Lucid Lynx (Ubuntu 10.04) without compiling

[ad#ad-1]I’m using Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Alpha and I decided to check out the latest RC kernel from the Kernel PPA. This is how I installed it on my i386 (32-bit) installation of Ubuntu.
Continue reading [HOWTO] Installing Kernel 2.6.33 on Lucid Lynx (Ubuntu 10.04) without compiling

[HOW TO] Installing Kernel 2.6.30 (or any latest version available) in Debian Lenny or Ubuntu without having to go through Compiling

[ad#ad-1]I have recently switched to Debian Lenny (from Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope) and it is quite stable. However, I wanted to try the latest stable linux kernel (2.6.30 as of now) in this machine and see how it goes. However there are not much problems, I just wanted to install it. I went to Debian Kernel Archive and downloaded the packages but it does not seem to work. So I headed over to the Ubuntu Kernel Archive and the kernel there worked. This is how I did it. Continue reading [HOW TO] Installing Kernel 2.6.30 (or any latest version available) in Debian Lenny or Ubuntu without having to go through Compiling